2019 Alpabetong Filipino Writing Sheets

I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers to my blog. Thank you very much for subscribing! To make up for the time I did not post any worksheets, I'm excited to share with you a new set of Filipino alphabet practice writing sheets. I recently purchased a large set of fonts from fonts4teachers.com and some of them have numbered arrow guides for young learners who are just starting to write letters. I used these fonts for the writing sheets I've made. I used the Zaner Bloser letters (upright letters) for manuscript printing, but I also have a font with D'Nealian letters (slightly slanted letters). If you would like the letters in D'Nealian, please send me a message or leave a comment. For my new subscribers, please note that I create these worksheets using clip art I purchased from teacherspayteachers.com. There's tons of free stuff that you can get from…

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Matching Cards: Mga Bagay na Magkapares

I've made a set of matching cards with objects that usually go together. There are eight cards or four matching pairs in each page. Cut the cards using the thin lines as guides and mix them up. Ask the child to read each card (the labels are in Filipino) and match them to the card with the object that usually goes with it. You can also ask the child to color the images before doing the matching activity. The matching pairs included in this set are as follows: mesa at upuan (table and chair)plato at kutsara at tinidor (plate and spoon and fork)kama at unan (bed and pillow)sipilyo at toothpaste (toothbrush and toothpaste)kalan at kawali (stove and pan)pandilig at halaman (watering can and plant)blusa at palda (blouse and skirt)sapatos at medyas (shoes and socks)plantsa at plantsahan (iron and ironing board)martilyo at pako (hammer and nail)karayom at sinulid (needle and thread)kandado…

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Magbasa Tayo!: Mga Ibon

This is a new installment to the set of Magbasa Tayo! worksheets. It includes a short and simple passage about birds and three worksheets on the same topic (Tama o mali, Color the birds, and Color by number). The passage and instructions are in Filipino. The first page of the PDF file contains its Terms of Use. Downloading the PDF file means you agree to abide by these terms. The clip art images and fonts used in this product are owned by the artists mentioned in the Credits Page of the PDF file.  Click on the link below, not the image, to open the PDF file in a new tab. The clip art images used in this product are by Little Red's Schoolhouse and Kari Bolt. Mga Ibon-SECURED

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Mga Damdamin (2018)

If you're teaching students how to tell what a person is feeling, this post might help you. Using the Male Cartoon Avatar Creator by Shark&Croc co., I created a set of male faces showing 16 different emotions (listed below). Labels for each emotion are provided in Filipino and in English. Students may be asked to place the correct label under the face showing that emotion.  calm (kalmado) contented/satisfied (kontento) happy (saya/masaya) joyful (tuwa/natutuwa) sad (lungkot/malungkot) scared (takot/natatakot) angry (galit) surprised (gulat) excited (sabik) doubt/doubtful (duda/nagdududa) tired (pagod) sleepy (antok/inaantok) nervous (kaba/kinakabahan) hurt (sakit/nasasaktan) annoyed (inis/naiinis) shy (hiya/nahihiya) If you have downloaded the file or files, it is assumed that you have agreed to the Terms of Use stated in the PDF file. These files are for personal, home, and multi-classroom use. You may not use them for profit. You may not upload them in any other website like Scribd or…

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Color by Number in Filipino

Here are two Color by Number activities in Filipino. It has two versions. One uses the color words asul, berde, and kahel (for the colors blue, green, and orange) and another that uses bughaw, luntian, and kulay-dalandan for the same colors. This is part of the next bundle I'm currently working on. If you wish to change the Filipino names for the colors, please leave a comment so I can post another version. Aside from the words kahel and kulay-dalandan, the word narangha is also used to refer to the color orange. (You might be wondering why it is called kulay-dalandan since the dalandan fruit is colored dark green. The word refers to color of the fruit inside, when it is peeled.) Aside from the word kayumanggi, the word kulay-tsokolate is also used to refer to the color brown. This set of activities features clip art by Kari Bolt and…

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