Free Printable DepEd School Calendar 2017-2018

FREE PRINTABLE DepEd SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2017-2018

On May 5, 2017, the Department of Education (DepEd) issued DepEd Order No. 25, s. 2017 entitled School Calendar for School Year 2017-2018. Based on the information in that Order, I created a School Calendar (June 2017 to April 2018) using Microsoft PowerPoint.

Each page has a monthly calendar with the DepEd school activities and holidays. Cells for holidays (regular and special non-working holidays) and weekends are colored gray to indicate that there are no classes during those days. There are, however, some activities scheduled during weekends.

The days for quarterly examinations, distribution of report cards, and parent-teacher conferences are indicated. Each month also includes the Number of Class Days on the upper right hand of the page and the tentative DepEd activities yet to be scheduled.

If you would like to edit the PowerPoint file, you may download the font I used (Bebas Neue) from here. I also provided a link to the PDF version of the calendar if you do not wish to edit the file. Click the link(s) below to open the file(s) in another tab.

DepEd SY 2017 to 2018 Calendar (Editable PowerPoint file)

DepEd SY 2017 to 2018 Calendar (PDF)

 

ACTIVITIES AND OBSERVANCES MANDATED BY LAW FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2017-2018

I also created a list of activities and observances mandated by law as indicated in the DepEd Order No. 25, s. 2017. I updated the list to reflect the dates as provided in the Department of Health’s (DOH) Health Calendar for 2017. I also added the dates indicated in the laws mandating the activity (placed inside parentheses). The dates of some activities I left blank since the DepEd has yet to issue notices on the specific dates of the different activities.

You may edit the PowerPoint file on the Activities and Observances Mandated by Law. I used the font Bebas Neue which you can download and install in your computer. I am also providing a PDF version of the file. Click the link(s) below to open the file(s) in another tab.

Activities and Observances 2017 to 2018 (Editable PowerPoint file)

Activities and Observances 2017 to 2018 (PDF)

By downloading the files above, you agree to the following:

  • The files are for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print the files and distribute the printouts to your children or students, other parents or teachers.
  • You MAY NOT share digital copies of these files with anyone. Just refer them to samutsamot.com.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute these files for profit or use them for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload these files or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox

Listahan ng mga Katangian ng Pagkatao

The PDF file below is a list of character traits in English and their Filipino translations. The list is divided in three parts: good character traits (mabubuting katangian ng pagkatao), bad character traits (mga katangian ng pagkatao na hindi mabuti), and neutral character traits (mga katangian na hindi mabuti o masama).

The list may be used by teachers and students for activities on character analysis or as a resource for developing characters for stories.

By downloading this PDF file, you agree to the following:

  • This PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print this PDF file and distribute the printouts to your children or students, but you MAY NOT distribute the printouts to other parents or teachers.
  • You MAY NOT share digital copies of this PDF file with anyone. Just refer them to samutsamot.com.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute this PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload this PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.  The illustrator mentioned below owns the copyrights to the clip art images in this PDF file. Uploading this file in another website is an infringement of her copyrights.

If you have any questions regarding the use of this PDF file, you may e-mail me at samutsamot.mom@gmail.com.

The PDF file features clip art by Kari Bolt. Check out her online store.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kari-Bolt-Clip-Art

Click the link below, not the image, to open the PDF file in another tab.

Mga Katangian ng Pagkatao

Mga Bahagi ng Katawan (NEW)

I recently purchased a clip art set from one of my favorite illustrators and I couldn’t wait to create teaching sheets using the cute clip art images. The illustrations are by Kari Bolt. Check out her store on Teachers Pay Teachers.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kari-Bolt-Clip-Art

The PDF file below has teaching sheets for the parts of the body. The front and back parts of the body are labeled. The labels are in Filipino. There is a girl version and a boy version of the lesson sheets. The parts of the face, arms, hands, and legs are also included.

I also made a version where I placed the English translations under the Filipino labels.

Click on the links below, not the screenshots of the file, to open each PDF file in another tab.

These PDF files available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF files are for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF files to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF files for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF files or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Bahagi ng Katawan_2 (labels in Filipino)

Bahagi ng Katawan Filipino-English (labels in Filipino with English translations)

Below are the screenshots of the teaching sheets.

If you would like me to customize the teaching sheets for you (use another Filipino language or add/remove certain labels to simplify them), leave a comment below. Happy teaching!

Mga Propesyon at Tungkulin sa Filipino

I started making a list of Filipino nouns with the common gender and I ended up making a long list of occupations and common roles and responsibilities. The Filipino nouns in this list have the common gender. They may be used to refer to either a male/man or female/woman.

Below is the link to a six-page PDF file entitled “Mga Propesyon at Tungkulin.” It has a list of professions categorized according to following fields:

  1. Community helpers (Examples: basurero, dentista, guwardiya, karpintero)
  2. Common roles and responsibilities (Examples: bisita, kaibigan, kamag-aral, pasahero)
  3. Family and relatives (Examples: anak, asawa, kapatid, manugang)
  4. Business (Examples: akawntant, bangkero, ingat-yaman, negosyante)
  5. Politics and law (Examples: abogado, alkalde, kongresista, senador)
  6. Military and security (Examples: heneral, hepe, koronel, sarhento)
  7. Education (Examples: dekano, guro, prinsipal, propesor, tutor)
  8. Health care (Examples: beterinaryo, manggagamot, maninistis, obstetra)
  9. Science (Examples: antropologo, heograpo, kimiko, pisiko)
  10. Journalism and publishing (Examples: kolumnista, makata, mananaliksik, patnugot)
  11. Religion (Examples: arsobispo, ministro, pastor, seminarista)
  12. Entertainment (Examples: akrobat. artista, direktor, prodyuser)
  13. Sports (Examples: atleta, himnasta, manlalaro, reperi)
  14. Music and arts (Examples: biyolinista, bokalista, manlililok, pintor)
  15. Other professions (Examples: alahero, manikurista, minero, sorbetero)
  16. Other roles (Examples: eksplorador, mangamgaso, testigo, turista)
  17. Other nouns with common gender (Examples: balikbayan, bilanggo, kriminal, rebelde)

The English translation for each profession or role is included in the list. Click on the link below to open the file in another tab. If you find an error in the PDF file, please leave a comment below.

Mga Propesyon at Tungkulin

This is available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF file to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Kasarian ng mga Pangngalan

A couple of years ago I posted a list of common nouns and categorized them according to gender. Upon reviewing that list, I realized that some entries were incorrect for reasons which I will explain in this post. I have revised that list, added more entries, and categorized quite a lot of them. The link to the revised list (a PDF file) is provided below.

A Filipino noun (pangngalan) may be categorized according the natural gender (male or female/lalaki o babae), the uncertainty of gender (male or female), or the lack of gender (nouns for nonliving things or concepts) of the person, animal, object, or idea the noun is pertaining to.

A Filipino noun may be classified as having one of the four genders: masculine gender (panlalaki), feminine gender (pambabae), common gender (pambalaki o di-tiyak), or neuter gender (walang kasarian).

Nouns with masculine gender are used for male persons and animals such as the nouns father/ama and rooster/tandang. Nouns with feminine gender are used for female persons and animals such as the nouns mother/ina and hen/inahin. Nouns with common gender are used for either male or female persons and animals such as the nouns parent/magulang and chicken/manok.

Nouns with masculine, feminine, and common genders are used for people and animals. The nouns with neuter gender are used for nonliving things, living things that are not classified as either male or female (such as trees and plants), and abstract nouns. The Filipino nouns puno, kahoy, bulaklak, and kalikasan are examples of nouns with neuter gender.

Some nouns with masculine gender are paired with their corresponding nouns with feminine gender. A tabular list of such Filipino noun pairs is provided in the PDF file below entitled “Kasarian ng mga Pangngalan sa Filipino.” Several of these Filipino noun pairs originated from the Spanish language.

Note that the noun pairs in this table are gender-specific. This means that Filipino nouns under the column heading “Pangngalang panlalaki” may only be used to refer to male persons (or animals) and those under the column heading “Pangngalang pambabae” may only be used to refer to female persons (or animals).

Filipino nouns such as doktor, senador, alkalde, and arsobispo have common gender; they may be used to refer to either men or women who hold these positions. (There are women in other parts of the world who hold religious occupations such as ministers, bishops, and priests.) So I have classified such nouns under the category pangngalang pambalaki or nouns with common gender.

In my previous list I incorrectly categorized the Filipino nouns arsobispo, obispo, pari and other religious occupations under nouns with masculine gender. Filipino nouns like empleyado, propesor, and eredero were similarly categorized incorrectly under pangngalang panlalaki. These nouns actually have the common gender.

The Filipino nouns doktora, senadora, alkaldesa, empleyada, propesora, and eredera have feminine gender. These nouns are gender-specific; they refer to women (not men) who hold these positions.

Nouns with the neuter gender are nouns used for living and nonliving things that may not be classified as either male or female. Nouns that refer to places and inanimate objects, as well as abstract nouns, have the neuter gender.

The PDF file below has 5 pages. It includes the following:

  1. the discussion on the gender of nouns in Filipino;
  2. a table with the Filipino noun pairs (masculine and feminine) and their English translations;
  3. a list of Filipino nouns with the masculine gender and their English translations; and
  4. a list of Filipino nouns with the feminine gender and their English translations.

Click on the link below to open the file in another tab. If you find an error in the PDF file, please leave a comment below.

Kasarian ng mga Pangngalan

This is available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF file to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox. 

My list of Filipino nouns with common gender will be posted soon. I have categorized these nouns according to different fields. It resulted in a list of occupations, roles, and responsibilities in Filipino.

Mga Salitang Inuulit (New list)

I revised some of the content and added more words to my list of Filipino repeated words (mga salitang inuulit). I incorporated the changes put forth by the Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino in their 2014 Ortograpiyang Pambansa.

Some Filipino words are formed by repeating a root word or base word. The new word obtained from such repetition or duplication would have a meaning different from that of the base word. Examples of such words are araw-araw, sabi-sabi, punit-punit, and pantay-pantay.

There are a few rules when repeating or duplicating Filipino words and these rules are included in the discussion. Several examples and their English definitions are provided for each rule.

The PDF file below has six pages. Click on the link below, not the image, to open the file in another tab.

Mga Salitang Inuulit (2016)

inuulit_1

This PDF file is for personal and classroom use only. You may print and distribute it to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit or use it for any commercial purpose. You also may not upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Mga Halaman sa Awit na “Bahay Kubo” Word Search

Below is a PDF file with two word search puzzles in Filipino. The word list for both puzzles are the 18 names of plants mentioned in the song “Bahay Kubo.”

The first word search puzzle has either horizontal (left to right/pahalang) or vertical (up to down/pababa) words. The second puzzle has horizontal, vertical, and diagonal (slanting downward/pahilis) words. There are no words spelled in reverse. The answer key follows each puzzle.

The puzzles are for personal and classroom use only. You may print and distribute these to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit or use these for any commercial purpose. You also may not upload this PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Click on the link below, not the image, to open the PDF file in another tab.

Mga Halaman sa Bahay Kubo Word Search

wsbk

 

Ito Ako! (All About Me)

I wanted to make a Filipino version of an “All About Me” information sheet which a child could fill up with information about himself or herself during the first day of school. The Filipino phrase “Tungkol Sa Akin” (Filipino translation of “about me”) sounded awkward. My husband and daughter thought that the title “Ito Ako!” (“This Is Me!”) sounded better.

The PDF file below is the “Ito Ako!” information sheet. The child can write the following information about himself or herself:

  1. Pangalan (Name)
  2. Kaarawan (Birthday)
  3. Edad (Age)
  4. Tirahan (Address)
  5. Telepono (Telephone number)
  6. Mga Paborito Ko (pagkain, laruan, lugar, palabas o sine) : The child writes down his or her favorite food, toy, place, and show or movie.
  7. Ang Pamilya Ko (My Family) : The child can draw his or her family in the space provided.
  8. Mga Libangan Ko (My Hobbies) : The child draws or lists his or her hobbies or favorite things to do in the space provided.
  9. “Dito ako magaling!” : The child draws or writes the things he or she is good at doing in the circular frame.
  10. “Paglaki ko, gusto ko maging…” : The child draws or writes in the circular frame what he or she wants to become in the future.

You can choose between a boy or a girl on the first page. The second page is the same for boys and girls.

All the clip art images of children in the PDF file are by Kari Bolt. Check out her online store by clicking the link or image below.

karibolt_credithttps://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kari-Bolt-Clip-Art

The information sheets are for personal and classroom use only. You may print and distribute these to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit or use these for any commercial purpose. You also may not upload this PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Click on the link below, not the images, to open the PDF file in another tab.

Ito Ako!

ito ako_1

ito ako_2

Want other data in these sheets? Leave a comment below.

Syllabication of Filipino Words

IMPORTANT NOTE: This is a very long post. Before you attempt to copy and paste the content of this post, you may click on the link below to open the 7-page PDF file of this post in another tab. Then you may download it and then print and read it later. You may not upload this file or any part of this post in any other website such as Scribd or SlideShare. I have seen people do this and such an act is a copyright infringement. So watch your karma.

Syllabication of Filipino Words

SYLLABICATION OF FILIPINO WORDS

A syllable is one unit of sound that forms the whole or part of a word. In Filipino, a syllable is called pantig and the syllabication of a word is called pagpapantig. When syllabicating words, syllables are separated by a middle dot called the interpunct (•) which is also called the interpoint, middot, or centered dot.

Syllable Forms
A syllable may be comprised of one vowel alone but a consonant needs a vowel to make a syllable. Syllables with two or more letters can have only one vowel. However, a syllable can have one or more consonants. The Filipino word for vowel is patinig (symbol: P) and the word for consonant is katinig (symbol: K).

Continue reading

More Worksheets for Preschool Bundle Vol. 2

Below are more PDF worksheets which I prepared for the Preschool Filipino Worksheets Bundle Vol. 2. These worksheets teach the Filipino words used for days, months, and several fruits.

Note that according to the Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino, the Filipino word for Wednesday is spelled Miyerkoles instead of Miyerkules.

Several images/clip art in these worksheets were obtained from openclipart.org. The other illustrations were made by me.

You may print and distribute these worksheets to your children or students, but you may not distribute them for profit or for any commercial purpose.

Instead of giving copies of the PDF files to your friends or co-teachers/tutors, please ask them to drop by my blog instead and download it from here. I’d really appreciate it.

Here are the links:

Mga Araw (6 pages)

Kahapon Ngayon Bukas (3 pages)

Mga Buwan (8 pages)

Mga Prutas (8 pages)