Pantig Worksheets (Part 3)

The pdf file below has three worksheets. Each worksheet asks the student to write the missing syllable (pantig) in order to complete the Filipino word for the illustration shown. All three worksheets have missing 3-letter syllables. Note that ng is considered to be one letter in the Filipino alphabet.

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom except for the following which were obtained from clker.com: tiger, wing, monkey, and lightning bolt.

You may print and distribute these worksheets to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit.

Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Isulat ang Pantig_2

pantig2_p1

pantig2_p2

pantig2_p3

Pantig Worksheets (Part 2)

The pdf file below has three worksheets. Each worksheet asks the student to write the missing syllable (pantig) in order to complete the Filipino word for the illustration shown. The first two worksheets have missing 2-letter syllables with the letter a. The third worksheet has missing 2-letter syllables with the letter o or u.

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom except for the following which were obtained from clker.com: soccer ball, house, bottle, tree, skull, and wheel.

You may print and distribute these worksheets to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit.

Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Isulat ang Pantig_1

pantig_p1pantig_p2pantig_p3

Naiibang Bagay Worksheets

When my daughter was little, we purchased a book on dinosaurs which came with several plastic toy dinosaurs. As an activity, she would group the dinosaurs in a certain way and we would guess the reason behind the grouping. For example, she would group the dinosaurs that had spikes on their backs and those without. When we guessed correctly, it would be our turn to group the dinosaurs and she would guess the reason for the grouping. We liked this activity because of the conversations we would have with her, which helped to enrich her vocabulary. Sometimes, we even failed to guess her reasoning.

The pdf file below has four worksheets which ask the student to color or circle the object or animal that does not belong in the group. I posted similar worksheets in 2013. I made some changes to those worksheets. All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom, except for the images for the three dogs, deer, and fish, which were obtained from clker.com.

If you are homeschooling your child, it is best to work on these sheets with them so that you will know his or her reason for choosing a certain object from the group.

Click on the link, not the thumbnails, to open the file.

Bilugan ang Naiiba Worksheets

naiiba_p1

naiiba_p3

naiiba_p4

Una at Huling Titik ng Salita Worksheets (Part 2)

In 2013, I posted several worksheets which asked the student to circle the first or the last letter of the Filipino name for the object shown. I’ve redesigned those worksheets and added a few more. Click on the links below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf files.

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom except for the following which were obtained from clker.com: tree, soccer ball, umbrella, car, butterfly, wheel, shopping bag, mountain, and door.

You may distribute these worksheets to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit.

Bilugan ang Unang Titik_2 (4 worksheets)

Bilugan ang Huling Titik_2 (3 worksheets)

unang titik_2

huling titik_2

 

Mga Hugis

The 2-page pdf file below shows the names of several shapes in Filipino.  The first page shows the Filipino names for the shapes and the second page shows both the Filipino and English names for the shapes. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Pangalan ng mga Hugis

Here’s a pdf file with two worksheets that ask the student to name the shape.

Isulat ang Pangalan ng Hugis

hugis_pangalan_1

hugis_pangalan_2

You may be wondering why I did not use the words biluhaba or habilog to refer to the oval shape. According to the UP Diksiyonaryong Filipino, the words biluhaba and habilog are adjectives. They are used to describe objects that are oval-shaped or ellipse-shaped.  The words obalo and obalado may be used as nouns (to refer to the shape itself) or as adjectives (to describe objects that are oval-shaped or ellipse-shaped).  Since I am naming the shape, I used the words obalo and obalado, not biluhaba or habilog.

So, you may say the sentences below:

Gumuhit ako ng obalo sa pisara. (I drew an oval on the blackboard.) The word obalo is a noun in this sentence. The word oval in English may be used as a noun or as an adjective.

Ang salamin sa dingding ay biluhaba. (The mirror on the wall is oval.)  The word biluhaba is an adjective in this sentence.

Ang salamin sa dingding ay habilog. (The mirror on the wall is oval.) The word habilog is an adjective in this sentence.

The words in the lesson sheets are nouns that name the shapes.  The word bilog may be used as a noun or an adjective. As an adjective, it can describe objects that are circular or spherical.

If you need to describe an object using the shape nouns, you may use the Filipino word hugis with the noun.  For example, if an object is shaped like a pyramid, you can describe it as “hugis-piramide” or “hugis-tagilo” and you may say “Ang ginawa kong laruan mula sa LEGO ay hugis-tagilo” or “Hugis-tagilo ang ginawa kong laruan mula sa LEGO.”

Other Filipino adjectives are kuwadrado or parisukat (for square-shaped objects), parihaba (for rectangular objects), biluhaba or habilog (for oval-shaped or ellipse-shaped objects), and kubiko (for cubic or cube-shaped objects).

To describe objects with other shapes, you may use the word hugis with the noun such as hugis-tatsulok (for triangular objects), hugis-diyamante (for diamond-shaped objects), hugis-puso (heart-shaped), hugis-tala (star-shaped), hugis-pentagono (pentagon-shaped), and hugis-silindro (cylindrical).

You may print and distribute these lesson sheets and worksheets to you children or students, but you may not do so for profit. Watch your karma.

Mga Bilang 1 Hanggang 10

Below is a handwriting worksheet on writing the numbers 1 to 10 in Filipino. The images for the dog, cat, bee, and fly (aso, pusa, bubuyog, langaw) were obtained from clker.com and are public domain clipart.  The other images were obtained from fonts (Afrika Safari F Gogga font by Fonts of Afrika, Butterflies font by Typadelic, Nina’s Animals font by Gorillablu) that are licensed as freeware.  Click the link below, not the thumbnail, to open the 2-page pdf file.

Mga Bilang Mula 1 Hanggang 10

You may print and distribute the worksheets to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit.

bilang_7

bilang_8

 

Mga Araw Worksheets

According to the UP Diksiyonaryong Filipino and the Manwal sa Masinop na Pagsulat of the Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino, the Filipino word for Wednesday is spelled Miyerkoles, not Miyerkules. So I made new handwriting worksheets on the days of the week in Filipino.

Although most calendars show Sunday (Linggo) as the first day of the week, according to an international standard, Monday (Lunes) is the first day of the week.

According to the Manwal sa Masinop na Pagsulat, the abbreviation for the days of the week are as follows: Lun, Mar, Miy, Huw, Biy, Sab, and Lin.

In one worksheet, the student is asked to trace the letters of the words for the days of the week.  In another, the student copies the words. In the last worksheet, the student is asked to write the days of the week in the correct order.

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom. You may print and distribute these worksheets to your students or children, but you may not do so for profit. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Mga Araw

Mga Araw_1Mga Araw_2Mga Araw_3

Mga Titik W at Y

The pdf file below has pages with illustrations of objects that begin with the Filipino letters W and Y.  I did not include the letter X and Z because most words that begin with these letters are borrowed words. Students may be asked to color the illustrations after reading the words.

Thumbnails of the pages are shown below. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the file.

Titik W at Y

Titik WTitik Y

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom except for the water lily and wreath, which were downloaded from the site clker.com. The site claims that the clip art are public domain.  To avoid infringement of copyright laws, please do not use these worksheets for commercial purposes.

You may print and distribute these worksheets to you children or students, but please do not do so for profit.

For the letters A, B, D, and E, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters G, H, I, and K, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters L, M, N, and NG, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters O, P, R, and S, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters T, U, and V, click here to view my previous post.

Mga Titik T, U, at V

The pdf file below has pages with illustrations of objects that begin with the Filipino letters T, U, and V.  Students may be asked to color the illustrations after reading the words.

Thumbnails of the pages are shown below. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the file.

Titik T U at V

Titik TTitik UTitik V

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom except for the following, which were downloaded from the site clker.com:

  1. the loaf of breaf (tinapay) and tiger (tigre);
  2. the brain (utak) and monkey (unggoy); and,
  3. the van, valentine, and volleyball.

The site claims that the clip art are public domain.  To avoid infringement of copyright laws, please do not use these worksheets for commercial purposes.

The Ivatan people comprise a Filipino ethnolinguistic group living in the Batanes Islands. The vakul is a headgear made of abaca fiber designed to protect the wearer from the rain and the heat of the sun.

You may print and distribute these worksheets to you children or students, but please do not do so for profit.

For the letters A, B, D, and E, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters G, H, I, and K, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters L, M, N, and NG, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters O, P, R, and S, click here to view my previous post.

The rest of the letters of the Filipino alphabet will be posted soon.

Mga Titik O, P, R, at S

The pdf file below has pages with illustrations of objects that begin with the Filipino letters O, P, R, and S.  I did not include the letter Q since most Filipino words that begin with this letter are proper nouns.

Students may be asked to color the illustrations after reading the words.

Thumbnails of the pages are shown below. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the file.

Titik O P R at S

Titik OTitik PTitik RTitik S

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom except for the following, which were downloaded from the site clker.com:

  1. the bishop (obispo);
  2. the butterfly (paruparo), umbrella (payong), and tree (puno);
  3. the cabbage (repolyo), queen (reyna) playing card, and gift (regalo); and,
  4. the set of keys (susi).

The clip art of the hospital (ospital) was downloaded from clipartlord.com.

Both sites claim that the clip art are public domain.  To avoid infringement of copyright laws, please do not use these worksheets for commercial purposes.

You may print and distribute these worksheets to you children or students, but please do not do so for profit.

For the letters A, B, D, and E, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters G, H, I, and K, click here to view my previous post.

For the letters L, M, N, and NG, click here to view my previous post.

The other letters will be posted soon.