Tula: Ang Aking Limang Pandama

I’ve been working on this Filipino poem on the five senses (limang pandama) for some time now and I’m happy that I finally finished it. The poem may be used as an introduction to a lesson on the five senses, as a poem to memorize, or as a reading exercise in Filipino. Please read the Terms of Use below before downloading the PDF file with the poem I wrote.

The copyrighted images used in the file are owned by Samut-samot Mom and Kari Bolt. Other images are public domain. Please do not upload this file in any other website.

TERMS OF USE  

By downloading this PDF file, you agree to the following:

  • This PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print this PDF file and distribute the printouts to your children or students, but you MAY NOT distribute the printouts to other parents or teachers.
  • You MAY NOT share digital copies of this PDF file with anyone. Just refer them to samutsamot.com.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute this PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload this PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

If you have any questions regarding the use of this PDF file, you may e-mail me at samutsamot.mom@gmail.com

Click on the link below to open the PDF file in another tab. If you would like to suggest an improvement to the poem, please leave a comment below.

Ang Aking Limang Pandama

Tula: Ang mga Bulag at ang Elepante

The poem “The Blind Men and the Elephant” was written by 19th century American poet John Godfrey Saxe. The poem is based on a parable from India about six blind men who wanted to know what an elephant was like. As each blind man was holding a different part of the elephant, they all had different opinions. The parable is used to teach that one’s experience is subjective and limited, and that we sometimes fail to account for the complete truth. It encourages better communication and respect for a variety of perspectives.

I thought it would be nice to translate this poem in Filipino. The poem “Ang mga Bulag at ang Elepante” is my adaptation of the poem in Filipino. (Please note that I excluded the last paragraph, the MORAL, in my adaptation). It may also be used as reading practice for young readers, as a poem to memorize for elementary students, or just something to read to your child at bedtime.

The image used in the PDF file was obtained from Wikimedia Commons.

I also found the Saxe poem sung by Natalie Merchant on YouTube.

TERMS OF USE  

By downloading this PDF file, you agree to the following:

  • This PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print this PDF file and distribute the printouts to your children or students, but you MAY NOT distribute the printouts to other parents or teachers.
  • You MAY NOT share digital copies of this PDF file with anyone. Just refer them to samutsamot.com.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute this PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload this PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

If you have any questions regarding the use of this PDF file, you may e-mail me at samutsamot.mom@gmail.com

Click on the link below to open the PDF file in another tab. Am I crazy giving this poem away for free? Yes, yes I am. If you would like to suggest an improvement to the adapted poem, please leave a comment below.

Ang mga Bulag at ang Elepante

 

Krusigrama: Mga Anyong Lupa

The PDF file below has two crossword puzzles in Filipino. The answers are eight landforms in Filipino (kapatagan, lambak, burol, pulo, talampas, bundok, bulkan and bulubundukin). The first crossword has clip art of the different landforms and the student will be asked to identify the landform using the clip art images. The second puzzle has descriptions (in Filipino) for each landform. The answers appear on the page after the blank crossword.

All the clip art used in these two crosswords are by Nedti (Hand Drawn Doodle Digital Clipart Design). Check out their online store at https://www.etsy.com/shop/Nedti.

By downloading this PDF file, you agree to the following TERMS OF USE:

  • This PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print the PDF file and distribute the printouts to your children or students, but you MAY NOT distribute the printouts to other parents or teachers.
  • You MAY NOT share digital copies of this PDF file with anyone. Just refer them to samutsamot.com.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute this PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload this PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox. The illustrator(s) mentioned above own the copyrights to the clip art images in this PDF file. Uploading this file in another website is an infringement of their copyrights.
  • If you have any questions regarding the use of this PDF files, you may e-mail me at samutsamot.mom@gmail.com

Click the link below to open the file in another tab.

Krusigrama Anyong Lupa

Mga Hanapbuhay (New version)

Last year I made a booklet showing different occupations in Filipino. Each occupation had a short description. I have reworked that booklet and created three PDF files with one occupation per page. I also changed some text and added clip art of tools or things used by each person in his or her job.

The files provide reading practice for young students. These may also be used to introduce the lesson on community helpers (mga katulong sa pamayanan) or occupations. The tools shown may also act as springboards for discussions about each occupation.

The files include the following occupations:

  1. magsasaka (farmer)
  2. mangingisda (fisherman)
  3. guro (teacher)
  4. kawani (employee; assistant)
  5. pulis (police officer)
  6. bombero (firefighter)
  7. doktor (doctor)
  8. nars (nurse)
  9. tsuper (driver)
  10. karpintero (carpenter)
  11. manggagawa sa pabrika (factory worker)
  12. tindera (seller)
  13. beterinaryo (veterinarian)
  14. dentista (dentist)
  15. basurero (garbage collector)
  16. dyanitor (janitor)
  17. kartero (mail carrier/postal carrier)
  18. trabahador (worker/laborer)
  19. modista (seamstress/dressmaker)
  20. tagapagluto (cook)
  21. manunulat (writer)
  22. marinero (mariner/sailor)

Below is a screenshot of the first two occupations.

By downloading these PDF files, you agree to the following TERMS OF USE:

  • These PDF files are for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print these PDF files and distribute the printouts to your children or students, but you MAY NOT distribute the printouts to other parents or teachers.
  • You MAY NOT share digital copies of these PDF files with anyone. Just refer them to samutsamot.com.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute these PDF files for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload these PDF files or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox. The illustrators mentioned below own the copyrights to the clip art images in these PDF files. Uploading these files in another website is an infringement of their copyrights.
  • If you have any questions regarding the use of these PDF files, you may e-mail me at samutsamot.mom@gmail.com

The illustrations made by Samut-Samot Mom are the following: magsasaka, mangingisda, guro, kawani, pulis, tsuper, karpintero, manggagawa sa pabrika, tindera, modista, tagapagluto, manunulat, marinero, kalabaw, dyip, fruit stand, and the tailor’s bust.

Other clip art illustrations of community helpers, background objects, tools and buildings are by Little Red’s Clip Art. Check out their store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Littlered

The hospital background and the interior of the veterinary and dentist offices are by Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah Designs. Check out their online store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Zip-a-dee-doo-dah-Designs

Some of the clip art of tools are by Kari Bolt. Check out her online store at Teachers Pay Teachers.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kari-Bolt-Clip-Art

All the other images were obtained from https://openclipart.org/.

Click the links below (the orange-colored text) to open the files in another tab:

Mga Hanapbuhay_2.1 : magsasaka (farmer), mangingisda (fisherman), guro (teacher), kawani (employee; assistant), doktor (doctor), nars (nurse), pulis (police officer),

Mga Hanapbuhay_2.2 : bombero (firefighter), tsuper (driver), karpintero (carpenter), manggagawa sa pabrika (factory worker), tindera (seller), beterinaryo (veterinarian), dentista (dentist)

Mga Hanapbuhay_2.3 : basurero (garbage collector), dyanitor (janitor), kartero (mail carrier/postal carrier), trabahador (worker/laborer), modista (seamstress/dressmaker), tagapagluto (cook), manunulat (writer), marinero (mariner/sailor)

Please leave a comment below for any corrections and/or suggestions on improving the text.

 

 

Mga Bahagi ng Katawan (NEW)

I recently purchased a clip art set from one of my favorite illustrators and I couldn’t wait to create teaching sheets using the cute clip art images. The illustrations are by Kari Bolt. Check out her store on Teachers Pay Teachers.

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kari-Bolt-Clip-Art

The PDF file below has teaching sheets for the parts of the body. The front and back parts of the body are labeled. The labels are in Filipino. There is a girl version and a boy version of the lesson sheets. The parts of the face, arms, hands, and legs are also included.

I also made a version where I placed the English translations under the Filipino labels.

Click on the links below, not the screenshots of the file, to open each PDF file in another tab.

These PDF files available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF files are for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF files to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF files for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF files or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Bahagi ng Katawan_2 (labels in Filipino)

Bahagi ng Katawan Filipino-English (labels in Filipino with English translations)

Below are the screenshots of the teaching sheets.

If you would like me to customize the teaching sheets for you (use another Filipino language or add/remove certain labels to simplify them), leave a comment below. Happy teaching!

Filipino translations of common English words, phrases, and sentence starters

One of the readers of my blog requested me to translate several English words and phrases into Filipino. He’s a young foreigner who will be visiting his friends in the Philippines this year. I admire his efforts in learning Filipino in order for him to be able to communicate with his Filipino friends and their family members.

Below is the link to a PDF file that has an alphabetical list of common English words, phrases, and sentence starters translated in Filipino. The list also includes an example (or two) of a sentence in English and its Filipino translation.

Filipino translations (Part 1)

This is available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF file to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Mga Propesyon at Tungkulin sa Filipino

I started making a list of Filipino nouns with the common gender and I ended up making a long list of occupations and common roles and responsibilities. The Filipino nouns in this list have the common gender. They may be used to refer to either a male/man or female/woman.

Below is the link to a six-page PDF file entitled “Mga Propesyon at Tungkulin.” It has a list of professions categorized according to following fields:

  1. Community helpers (Examples: basurero, dentista, guwardiya, karpintero)
  2. Common roles and responsibilities (Examples: bisita, kaibigan, kamag-aral, pasahero)
  3. Family and relatives (Examples: anak, asawa, kapatid, manugang)
  4. Business (Examples: akawntant, bangkero, ingat-yaman, negosyante)
  5. Politics and law (Examples: abogado, alkalde, kongresista, senador)
  6. Military and security (Examples: heneral, hepe, koronel, sarhento)
  7. Education (Examples: dekano, guro, prinsipal, propesor, tutor)
  8. Health care (Examples: beterinaryo, manggagamot, maninistis, obstetra)
  9. Science (Examples: antropologo, heograpo, kimiko, pisiko)
  10. Journalism and publishing (Examples: kolumnista, makata, mananaliksik, patnugot)
  11. Religion (Examples: arsobispo, ministro, pastor, seminarista)
  12. Entertainment (Examples: akrobat. artista, direktor, prodyuser)
  13. Sports (Examples: atleta, himnasta, manlalaro, reperi)
  14. Music and arts (Examples: biyolinista, bokalista, manlililok, pintor)
  15. Other professions (Examples: alahero, manikurista, minero, sorbetero)
  16. Other roles (Examples: eksplorador, mangamgaso, testigo, turista)
  17. Other nouns with common gender (Examples: balikbayan, bilanggo, kriminal, rebelde)

The English translation for each profession or role is included in the list. Click on the link below to open the file in another tab. If you find an error in the PDF file, please leave a comment below.

Mga Propesyon at Tungkulin

This is available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF file to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Kasarian ng mga Pangngalan

A couple of years ago I posted a list of common nouns and categorized them according to gender. Upon reviewing that list, I realized that some entries were incorrect for reasons which I will explain in this post. I have revised that list, added more entries, and categorized quite a lot of them. The link to the revised list (a PDF file) is provided below.

A Filipino noun (pangngalan) may be categorized according the natural gender (male or female/lalaki o babae), the uncertainty of gender (male or female), or the lack of gender (nouns for nonliving things or concepts) of the person, animal, object, or idea the noun is pertaining to.

A Filipino noun may be classified as having one of the four genders: masculine gender (panlalaki), feminine gender (pambabae), common gender (pambalaki o di-tiyak), or neuter gender (walang kasarian).

Nouns with masculine gender are used for male persons and animals such as the nouns father/ama and rooster/tandang. Nouns with feminine gender are used for female persons and animals such as the nouns mother/ina and hen/inahin. Nouns with common gender are used for either male or female persons and animals such as the nouns parent/magulang and chicken/manok.

Nouns with masculine, feminine, and common genders are used for people and animals. The nouns with neuter gender are used for nonliving things, living things that are not classified as either male or female (such as trees and plants), and abstract nouns. The Filipino nouns puno, kahoy, bulaklak, and kalikasan are examples of nouns with neuter gender.

Some nouns with masculine gender are paired with their corresponding nouns with feminine gender. A tabular list of such Filipino noun pairs is provided in the PDF file below entitled “Kasarian ng mga Pangngalan sa Filipino.” Several of these Filipino noun pairs originated from the Spanish language.

Note that the noun pairs in this table are gender-specific. This means that Filipino nouns under the column heading “Pangngalang panlalaki” may only be used to refer to male persons (or animals) and those under the column heading “Pangngalang pambabae” may only be used to refer to female persons (or animals).

Filipino nouns such as doktor, senador, alkalde, and arsobispo have common gender; they may be used to refer to either men or women who hold these positions. (There are women in other parts of the world who hold religious occupations such as ministers, bishops, and priests.) So I have classified such nouns under the category pangngalang pambalaki or nouns with common gender.

In my previous list I incorrectly categorized the Filipino nouns arsobispo, obispo, pari and other religious occupations under nouns with masculine gender. Filipino nouns like empleyado, propesor, and eredero were similarly categorized incorrectly under pangngalang panlalaki. These nouns actually have the common gender.

The Filipino nouns doktora, senadora, alkaldesa, empleyada, propesora, and eredera have feminine gender. These nouns are gender-specific; they refer to women (not men) who hold these positions.

Nouns with the neuter gender are nouns used for living and nonliving things that may not be classified as either male or female. Nouns that refer to places and inanimate objects, as well as abstract nouns, have the neuter gender.

The PDF file below has 5 pages. It includes the following:

  1. the discussion on the gender of nouns in Filipino;
  2. a table with the Filipino noun pairs (masculine and feminine) and their English translations;
  3. a list of Filipino nouns with the masculine gender and their English translations; and
  4. a list of Filipino nouns with the feminine gender and their English translations.

Click on the link below to open the file in another tab. If you find an error in the PDF file, please leave a comment below.

Kasarian ng mga Pangngalan

This is available for free, so the least you can do in return is to follow these terms:

  • The PDF file is for personal and classroom use ONLY.
  • You may print and distribute the PDF file to your children or students.
  • You MAY NOT print and distribute the PDF file for profit or use it for any commercial purpose.
  • You MAY NOT upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox. 

My list of Filipino nouns with common gender will be posted soon. I have categorized these nouns according to different fields. It resulted in a list of occupations, roles, and responsibilities in Filipino.

Mga Salitang Inuulit (New list)

I revised some of the content and added more words to my list of Filipino repeated words (mga salitang inuulit). I incorporated the changes put forth by the Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino in their 2014 Ortograpiyang Pambansa.

Some Filipino words are formed by repeating a root word or base word. The new word obtained from such repetition or duplication would have a meaning different from that of the base word. Examples of such words are araw-araw, sabi-sabi, punit-punit, and pantay-pantay.

There are a few rules when repeating or duplicating Filipino words and these rules are included in the discussion. Several examples and their English definitions are provided for each rule.

The PDF file below has six pages. Click on the link below, not the image, to open the file in another tab.

Mga Salitang Inuulit (2016)

inuulit_1

This PDF file is for personal and classroom use only. You may print and distribute it to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit or use it for any commercial purpose. You also may not upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.

Si Pyramus at si Thisbe

In our English class during our freshman year in high school, we had the opportunity to study Edith Hamilton’s book Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes. I was inspired to translate one of the eight brief tales of lovers in that book. I chose the story of Pyramus and Thisbe because it reminded me of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet (although Pyramus and Thisbe predated Romeo and Juliet); the story of forbidden love between lovers from feuding families.

I was thinking that it would be a good reading exercise for high school students who are studying the ancient world (e.g., Babylon) in their Araling Panlipunan subject (I think this topic is studied by Grade 8 students). Although, the story is a reading exercise in Filipino.

In the PDF file below, I’ve translated Edith Hamilton’s English version of Pyramus and Thisbe by Ovid and I’ve also included some dialogue from Thomas Bulfinch’s version of the same story from his book The Age of Fable.

There is also a list of vocabulary words in Filipino with English definitions. I’ve also included a set of questions that the students can answer.

The story may also be an example of a legend (alamat) since it tells of the origin of why the fruit of the mulberry tree is red instead of white. The immature fruits of the mulberry tree are actually colored white, green, or pale yellow. In most species, the fruits turn pink and then red while ripening, and then dark purple or black. They have a sweet flavor when fully ripe.

Click on the link below to open the PDF file in another tab.

Si Pyramus at si Thisbe

This PDF file is for personal and classroom use only. You may print and distribute it to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit or use it for any commercial purpose. You also may not upload the PDF file or any part of it in any other website such as (but not limited to) Scribd or SlideShare, or cloud storage sites such as (but not limited to) Google Drive or Dropbox.