Mga Hugis

The 2-page pdf file below shows the names of several shapes in Filipino.  The first page shows the Filipino names for the shapes and the second page shows both the Filipino and English names for the shapes. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Pangalan ng mga Hugis

Here’s a pdf file with two worksheets that ask the student to name the shape.

Isulat ang Pangalan ng Hugis

hugis_pangalan_1

hugis_pangalan_2

You may be wondering why I did not use the words biluhaba or habilog to refer to the oval shape. According to the UP Diksiyonaryong Filipino, the words biluhaba and habilog are adjectives. They are used to describe objects that are oval-shaped or ellipse-shaped.  The words obalo and obalado may be used as nouns (to refer to the shape itself) or as adjectives (to describe objects that are oval-shaped or ellipse-shaped).  Since I am naming the shape, I used the words obalo and obalado, not biluhaba or habilog.

So, you may say the sentences below:

Gumuhit ako ng obalo sa pisara. (I drew an oval on the blackboard.) The word obalo is a noun in this sentence. The word oval in English may be used as a noun or as an adjective.

Ang salamin sa dingding ay biluhaba. (The mirror on the wall is oval.)  The word biluhaba is an adjective in this sentence.

Ang salamin sa dingding ay habilog. (The mirror on the wall is oval.) The word habilog is an adjective in this sentence.

The words in the lesson sheets are nouns that name the shapes.  The word bilog may be used as a noun or an adjective. As an adjective, it can describe objects that are circular or spherical.

If you need to describe an object using the shape nouns, you may use the Filipino word hugis with the noun.  For example, if an object is shaped like a pyramid, you can describe it as “hugis-piramide” or “hugis-tagilo” and you may say “Ang ginawa kong laruan mula sa LEGO ay hugis-tagilo” or “Hugis-tagilo ang ginawa kong laruan mula sa LEGO.”

Other Filipino adjectives are kuwadrado or parisukat (for square-shaped objects), parihaba (for rectangular objects), biluhaba or habilog (for oval-shaped or ellipse-shaped objects), and kubiko (for cubic or cube-shaped objects).

To describe objects with other shapes, you may use the word hugis with the noun such as hugis-tatsulok (for triangular objects), hugis-diyamante (for diamond-shaped objects), hugis-puso (heart-shaped), hugis-tala (star-shaped), hugis-pentagono (pentagon-shaped), and hugis-silindro (cylindrical).

You may print and distribute these lesson sheets and worksheets to you children or students, but you may not do so for profit. Watch your karma.

Mga Bilang 1 Hanggang 10

Below is a handwriting worksheet on writing the numbers 1 to 10 in Filipino. The images for the dog, cat, bee, and fly (aso, pusa, bubuyog, langaw) were obtained from clker.com and are public domain clipart.  The other images were obtained from fonts (Afrika Safari F Gogga font by Fonts of Afrika, Butterflies font by Typadelic, Nina’s Animals font by Gorillablu) that are licensed as freeware.  Click the link below, not the thumbnail, to open the 2-page pdf file.

Mga Bilang Mula 1 Hanggang 10

You may print and distribute the worksheets to your children or students, but you may not do so for profit.

bilang_7

bilang_8

 

Mga Damdamin

Below is a Filipino version of the chart “How do you feel today?” (Ano ang nararamdaman mo ngayon?).  This is a new version of the one I previously posted. The student may be asked to color the face that represents how he or she feels. A box is provided so that the student can draw his or her emotion if he or she can not choose from the emotions shown.

Click on the link, not the thumbnail, to open the pdf file. An English version follows the Filipino version.  All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom. You may print and distribute these to others, but you may not do so for profit.

Ano ang Nararamdaman Mo Ngayon

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How do you feel today

feelings_1

Ang Limang Pandama

The pdf file below shows the five senses (pandama) in Filipino, together with the corresponding body parts: paningin (sight), pang-amoy (smell), pandinig (hearing), panlasa (taste), and pansalat (touch).  It may be used as a teaching aid. Click on the link, not the thumbnail, to open the pdf file.

 Ang Limang Pandama

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The first worksheet in the pdf file below asks the student to color the senses or body parts he or she will use for the object shown.  The student may color more than one. It is best to have the student explain his or her answers.

The second and third worksheet ask the student to color the sense/body part that he or she will have to use in order to be able to answer the question. The student may color more than one. It is best to have the student explain his or her answers. Click on the link, not the thumbnail, to open the pdf file.

Ang Limang Pandama_2

pandama_1

pandama_4

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom. You may print and distribute these worksheets to your children or students, but please do not do so for profit.

Ang Parabula ng mga Posporo

Para sa imo ini, ‘Nay!  (“This is for you, Mom!” in Bikol)

This short story was written by my late mother, Jean Llorin, a long time ago in English.  A few years back, she asked me to draw pictures to go with her story.  I’ve translated the story in Filipino and added a few more important details that I felt the story needed. A thumbnail of the first page is shown below.

Click on the link below, not the thumbnail, to open the 4-page pdf file. All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom.

Feel free to share this story with your children, students, and friends, but do not do so for profit or my mother’s ghost will haunt you!

Please note that I am not a writer (I’m actually an engineering graduate), so feel free to leave comments on how I can improve the story. Thanks!

Ang Parabula ng mga Posporo

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Munting Langgam

The pdf file below has a poem about ants (langgam) and a writing exercise for students. Click on the link, not the thumbnails, to open the 3-page pdf file.

Munting Langgam

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The poem, its accompanying drawing, and the illustrations on the writing exercise page are by samutsamot_mom.

Feel free to print and distribute the reading and writing exercise to your children or students, but please do not do so for profit.

Have you written a Filipino poem, short story, or reading exercise for beginner readers? If you would like me to make it into a pdf file to be shared freely with other Filipino teachers and parents who come across this blog, please leave a comment. Thank you!

Ang Bahaghari

The pdf file below has a poem on rainbows (bahaghari) in Filipino. In the next page, the child is asked to color the rainbow with the colors listed. Click on the link, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Bahaghari

bahaghari_p1bahaghari_p2

The poem and its accompanying drawing are by samutsamot_mom. The rainbow clipart in the second page was obtained from clker.com.

Feel free to print and distribute the file to your children or students, but please do not do so for profit.

 

 

Mga Araw Worksheets

According to the UP Diksiyonaryong Filipino and the Manwal sa Masinop na Pagsulat of the Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino, the Filipino word for Wednesday is spelled Miyerkoles, not Miyerkules. So I made new handwriting worksheets on the days of the week in Filipino.

Although most calendars show Sunday (Linggo) as the first day of the week, according to an international standard, Monday (Lunes) is the first day of the week.

According to the Manwal sa Masinop na Pagsulat, the abbreviation for the days of the week are as follows: Lun, Mar, Miy, Huw, Biy, Sab, and Lin.

In one worksheet, the student is asked to trace the letters of the words for the days of the week.  In another, the student copies the words. In the last worksheet, the student is asked to write the days of the week in the correct order.

All illustrations are by samutsamot_mom. You may print and distribute these worksheets to your students or children, but you may not do so for profit. Click on the link below, not the thumbnails, to open the pdf file.

Mga Araw

Mga Araw_1Mga Araw_2Mga Araw_3

Mga Karaniwang Salita sa Filipino (Part 2)

The 7-page pdf file below lists common Filipino nouns (pangngalan). These are nouns usually encountered in stories. It may be used to check your student’s (or child’s) vocabulary in preparation for his or her reading instruction. The lists include: Mga Tao at Nilalang, Mga Lugar at Pook, Mga Hayop, Mga Bagay sa Kalikasan, Mga Bagay at Sasakyan, Bahagi ng Katawan, and Oras at Panahon.

Mga Karaniwang Salita_3

For other lists of common Filipino words, click here to view my previous post.

Mga Karaniwang Salita sa Filipino (Part 1)

If you have a preschooler or teach preschoolers, you may have heard of the term “sight words.” Sight words refer to the set of words most frequently used and repeated. Sight words are important in teaching children to read. Children have to learn to quickly recognize and read them on sight. The list of sight words in English can easily be found and downloaded from the Internet.

I wanted to make a similar list of Filipino sight words. I started with the commonly used short words (1 to 3-letter Filipino words) and included their variants. I also listed the common Filipino pronouns (panghalip) and their variants. Then the common Filipino adverbs (pang-abay) and conjunctions (pangatnig) came next. Click on the link below to open the pdf file.

Mga Karaniwang Salita_1 : A 7-page pdf file with common Filipino words including Filipino pronouns, adverbs, and conjunctions.

I also made a list of common Filipino adjectives (pang-uri) and verbs (pandiwa). For many of the adjectives, I matched the opposites. For the list of verbs, the root word is in bold and the most common form of the verb follows the root word. Click on the link below to open the pdf file.

Mga Karaniwang Salita_2 : A 7-page pdf file with common Filipino adjectives and verbs.

The lists I created include most of the Dolch sight words. They are not based on any survey or study I made, but they are based on my personal experience with Filipino literature for children. You may use them to check your student’s (or child’s) vocabulary or familiarity with common Filipino words.

I will post a list of common Filipino nouns soon.

If you have any suggestions or corrections, please leave a comment below.